It is no surprise to anyone that elementary-aged children are social beings. Up until this point in their lives, they have only identified themselves as part of their families. As they begin to exercise their independence from their familial society and become more ext...

The first six weeks of school can often be trying times, as students navigate the world of new and established friendships while at the same time adjusting back to the daily routines of life at school. Though multi-age classrooms provide Montessori students with relati...

Original Photo by JJ Jordan on Unsplash

I’m in an Upper Elementary classroom in Illinois. We’re working our way through Romeo and Juliet, acting out scenes and discussing the play’s themes as we go. During a pause in the balcony scene, an 11-year-old female st...

Parents often remark that NMS teachers have a magical power for getting children to listen. There may be some “magic” that comes with being in a school community that helps with listening, but teachers also have built up their own toolboxes for communicating with stude...

Electronic music plays.

A hand signal counts down: three, two, one . . . now!  

“Welcome to The NMS Listener. In this segment we’re going to hold a debate about co-ed sports . . .”

With these words students began recording a series of segments for a podcast they created d...

An example of Grace and Courtesy: children learn how to interrupt politely when a teacher is working with another child—by quietly placing a hand on the teacher's shoulder and waiting patiently.


The Practical Life area is the heart and soul of a Montessori classroom be...

Lower Elementary (ages 6-9) is a time when children enter what Maria Montessori called the Second Plane of Development. During this time, children go from working and playing alone to seeking out interactions with peers. It is a time of moral development when children...

Just as our students have the opportunity to learn and refine their skills, so too do NMS teachers. We often use time during our monthly staff meetings to discuss topics such as  diversity, different learning styles and teaching methods. During a recent meeting, we spe...

“No.” “Stop it.” “Don’t touch that!” As a parent, you might find yourself using these words and phrases when your child begins to make their own choices. It’s a natural reaction for most—so if you use these terms, you are not alone. Take a moment to think about how you...

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Assessing Student Learning in a Montessori Environment

October 16, 2019

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